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Dakota Language and Cultural Preservation

Dakoteyah Wogdaka!
Talk Dakota!

Lesson 13

A?petu Iyohi Woeye
(everyday phrases)


Wacipi ta mninkte. Yau’kta he/hwo? (I am going to the pow wow. Are you coming)?

Omapi sni, wayaza tipi ta mninkte. (I don't feel well, I am going to the clinic).

Khohan tokiya mninkte, wakaniza awanwicayakdaka oyaki he/hwo? ? (Can you take care of the children, while I go out)?

Takomni wakankdi onge iwacu kte. Mazaska etan omaya'ku oyaki he/hwo? (I need to get some gas, can you give me some money)?

Ipobdu ki osiceca aya ga wasme aya. Ecanni wowasi unkikdustan unkokihib he/hwo? (The blizzard looks bad and the snow is getting deep, can we leave work early)?

Wokiksuya waecunpi ki wahanpi ga wikdi'unkagapi onge yakage kta he/hwo? (Are you going to make some soup and fry bread for the memorial)?

Toksa aguyapi skuyeda ga opemnikagapi spanwaye ga wokiksuya waecunpi ta amninkte. (I am going to bake some cakes and pies to take to the memorial).

Okhansukhute tipi unyinkte ga htayetu woyute unyuta ga hetan khansu owoyawa unskatapi kta. (Let's go to the casino to have dinner and play bingo).

Okhansukhute tipi bda owakihisni, mazaska manica. (I can't go to the casino, I don't have any money).

Wagner ta amada oyaki he/hwo? (Can you give me a ride to Wagner)?

Wi'hiyena tonakca he/hwo? Mazaskanskan tonakca he/hwo? (What time is it)?

De anpetu wasicamu owakihi kte sni, wamayazaka. (I can't come into work today, I am sick).

Iyehan waisni ga Owayawa watoksupi opta ihpeya amayab. Owayawa tipi ta amada oyaki he/hwo? ( I missed the school bus, will you give me a ride to school)?

De hanhepi omayani kta he/hwo? Tohan yakdi kta he/hwo? (Are you going out tonight? When will you be back)?

Dowacin. Tohan htayetu woyute dustan kta he/hwo? (I am hungry when will you have dinner ready)?

Waksica yuzaza, oihpeya tankad aya, ga owanka kahinta. (Wash the dishes, take out the trash and sweep the floor).

Hayapi nitawa duzaza kta he/hwo? (Are you going to wash your clothes)?

Thimahe nitawa apikiya oyaki he/hwo? (Will you clean up your room)?

Omasape owayawa nitawa taku he/hwo? (What is your cell phone number)?

De anpetu osiceca kte seca. Toked idukca, wicakahwoka ahihunni kta he/hwo? (It looks like it is going to storm today. Do you think we will get tornados today)?

Pahiya magazu ga heun canku ki mni tan ye/yo. (It rained so much the road is flooded out).

Wisdom of the Elder - Clarence Rockboy

"A Gift of Wisdom to Share with the People"

 

 

clarence

 

Ata We'ceya
Clarence Rockboy
Ihaηktoηwaη (Yankton Sioux)










Clarence Homer Rockboy
April 22, 1933 - December 24, 2006


Clarence Homer Rockboy passed into the Spirit World in the early morning hours on December 24, 2006. Born at home on April 22, 1933 at Dixon, South Dakota to Eliza Little Bird Rockboy and Joseph Rockboy. While attending Winner High School in Winner, South Dakota Clarence made the All State Basket Ball Team. He was one of three of the first Native Americans to attend The University of South Dakota in Vermillion. Clarence served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War while transporting military supplies from the Mainland to Korea. After wartime he played football for the Air Force team that took him all over the world.

Clarence spent the past 26 years with his lifetime companion Charon Asetoyer-Rockboy in Lake Andes, South Dakota. Clarence and Charon raised two sons Chaske Joseph Rockboy and Reynolds James Bruguier.

Clarence is a Master of the Art of Traditional Native American beadwork. His work has been shown in Museums and shows in South Dakota, New York City, Chicago, California, the South West, and Europe. Some of Clarence’s pieces are part of the permanent collection at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. He has received numerous accolades for his work including the South Dakota Living Indian Treasure Award in 1994 for highest honors and excellence in Native American Art Leadership over a lifetime from the Northern Plains Tribal Arts.

His legacy will live on throughout the generations to come. Clarence spent his life teaching and mentoring countless young people in the art of beadwork. Clarence is best known for making instruments used in the Native American Church.

Clarence is a member of the Yankton Sioux Tribe and worked for the sovereignty of all Native Peoples. Clarence served on many Boards and committees throughout his life including the Ihanktowan Game Fish and Wildlife Committee and the Ihanktowan Water Rights Committee for the Yankton Sioux Tribe and was respected as a Water Rights Expert; he also served as Treasurer of the Native American Church of North America.

After returning to Lake Andes in 1985 with his family, wife Charon and Clarence, Everdale Song Hawk, Jackie Rouse, and Lorenzo Dion realized the need to assist the community in addressing some of the unmet needs, especially in the area of health education and cultural preservation. Together they started the Native American Community Board which is the parent organization to the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center and the Women’s Lodge. Clarence spent many hours working with the Child Development Program and later the Dakota Language Immersion Program. Clarence developed Dakota Language materials to assist in the preservation of the Dakota language.

Those who have preceded Clarence in death, Mother Eliza Little Bird Rockboy, Father Joseph Rockboy, Grandfather George Rockboy, Great Grandfather Mosquito, Great Great Grandfather Kills Omaha.


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Dakoteyah Wogdaka!
Talk Dakota!

Lesson 11

Dakota Peźuta
(Dakota medicines)

Mni wićoni (water of life)
Peźi h́ota (sage)
H́aηte (cedar)
Ćaηdi (tobacco)
Siηkpetawote (bitterroot)
Waćaηǵa (sweet grass)
Ćeyaka (mint)
Wasna (pemmican)
Ćaηśaśa (kinnikinic, willow bark for smoking)
Wah́pe (tea)
Peźutayuh́ah́a/hiiyatiηze (cloves)
Azidya/izidya (to smudge)
Ćaηnuηpa (pipe)
Ćaηnuηpa iηyaη (pipestone)

Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4 Lesson 5 Lesson 6
Lesson 7 Lesson 8 Lesson 9 Lesson 10 Lesson 11 Lesson 12

Dakoteyah Wogdaka!
Talk Dakota!

Lesson 12

Aηpetu Iyohi Woeye
(everyday phrases)

Otoηwe ekta bda. (I am going to town).

Mazaska tipi ekta bda. (I am going to the bank).

Mazopiye taηka ekta bda. (I am going to the supermarket).

Wopetoη bda. (I am going shopping).

Wih́di okaśtaη tipi ekta bda. (I am going to the gas station).

Wowaśi ećon bda. (I am going to work).

Wayawatipi ekta bda. (I am going to the school).

Hipiya tipi ekta bda. (I am going to the dentist office).

Owayazaηkatipi ekta bda. (I am going to the hospital).

Wapazopitipi ekta bda. (I am going to the movies).

 



Owoźaźatipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the laundromat).
Wayekiyatipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the casino).
Pahiη piya tipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the beauty salon).
Owaηka tipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the motel).
Owotetipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the restaurant).
Otoηwetaηka ekta yapi. (They are going to the city).
Wowapi oźuźu tipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the post office).
Waoηspewakaηtu tipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the college).
Okaśda tipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the barbershop).
Wayasu tipi ekta yapi. (They are going to the courthouse).



Tipi Wakaη ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the church).
Peźuta mazopiye ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the drugstore).
Wićaśaitokśu oinaźiη ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the bus depot).
Woyute mazopiye ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the grocery store).
Owaćitipi ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the dance hall).
Ośkatetipi ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the sports center).
Takad iyaye. (He/she has gone outside).
Timahed iyaye. (He/she has gone inside).
Oiśtiηme kiη ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the bedroom).
Oigduźaźapi ekta iyaye. (He/she has gone to the bathroom).



Wakiya tipi ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the lawyer’s office).
Wakaηh́di tipi ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the electric company).
Tićaǵapi ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the building construction site).
Ide kasni tipi ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the fire department).
Owićakaśke tipi ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the police station).
Iyećiηka piya tipi ekta uηyapí. (We are going to the garage).
Omazapetipi ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the telephone company).
Peźuta wićaśa ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the doctor).
Peźutawiyopeya ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the pharmacist).
H́emani oinaźiη ekta uηyapi. (We are going to the train depot).



Woyute oηǵe maḱu. (Give me some food).
Peźuta oηǵe maḱu. (Give me some medicine).
Mni oηǵe maḱu. (Give me some water).
Heyake oηǵe maḱu. (Give me some clothes).
Mazaska oηǵe maḱu. (Give me some money).



Ćaηdi oηǵe wićaḱu. (Give them some cigarettes).
Peźi h́ota oηǵe wićaḱu. (Give them some sage).
Wakadyapi oηǵe wićaḱu. (Give them some coffee).
Waśtukena oηǵe wićaḱu. (Give them some dried corn).
Ṕaṕa oηǵe wićaḱu. (Give them some jerky).



Wah́pe oηǵe uηḱupi. (Give us some tea).
Aǵuyapi oηǵe uηḱupi. (Give us some bread).
Wahaηpi oηǵe uηḱupi. (Give us some soup).
Waskuyeća oηǵe uηḱupi. (Give us some fruit).
Tado oηǵe uηḱupi. (Give us some meat).



Wotaηiη wowapi waηźi iću. (Get a newspaper).
Ogde waηźi iću. (Get a coat).
Nakpiyutake waηźi iću. (Get a scarf).
Śina waηźi iću. (Get a blanket).
Taspaη waηźi iću. (Get an apple).



Iyećiηka ikikću. (Get your car).
Haηpa ikikću. (Get your shoes).
Napiηkpa ikikću. (Get your gloves).
Śuηka ikikću. (Get your dog).
Nićuηkśi ikikću. (Get your daughter).



Asaηpi oηǵe iwaću. (I got/took some milk).
Taspaηzi waηźi iwaću. (I got/took an orange).
Woźapi oηǵe iwaću. (I got/took some pudding).
Hiipaśku waηźi iwaću. (I got/took a toothpick).



Asaηpi oηǵe imićiću. (I got myself some milk).
Ipahiη waηźi imićiću. (I got myself a pillow).
Paikpaźaźa oηǵe imićiću. (I got myself some shampoo).
Ćaηhaηpśaśa oηǵe imićiću. (I got myself some candy).
Oη wagaǵeǵepi waηźi imićiću. (I got myself a sewing machine).



Oyate waećoηpi kiη tuktetu he? (Where is the tribal office)?
Bde Ihaηke tuktetu he? (Where is Lake Andes)?
Mazopiye tuktetu he? (Where is the store)
Śina Sapa tuktetu he? (Where is Marty)?
Owakpamni tuktetu he? (Where is Greenwood)?
Wih́di okaśtaη tipi tuktetu he? (Where is the gas station)?
Owayaηzaηkatipi tuktetu he? (Where is the hospital)?
Owićikaśketipi tuktetu he? (Where is the police station)?
Owotetipi tuktetu he? (Where is the restaurant)?




Tohaη omnićiye he? (When is the meeting)?

Tohaη wotapi he? (When are they eating)?
Tohaη da he? (When are you going)?
Tohaη wowaśi ećoη da he? (When are you going to work)?
Tohaη woyawa da he? (When are you going to school)?



Tohaη peźuta kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting/taking the medicine)?
Tohaη iyećiηka kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting/taking the car)?
Tohaη iteowapi kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting/taking the picture)?
Tohaη wowapi kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting/taking the papers)?
Tohaη heyake kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting/taking the clothes)?




Tohaη wiηyaη kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting the woman)?
Tohan ikmuna kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting the kitten)?
Tohan niciηkśi iyaću kta he? (When are you getting your son)?
Tohaη tataηka kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting the buffalo)?
Tohaη wićiηćana kiη iyaću kta he? (When are you getting the girl)?




Tohaη wakaηheźa kiη iwićayaću kta he? (When are you going to get the children)?
Tohaη śuηǵpana kiη iwićayaću kta he? (When are you going to get the puppies)?
Tohan hokśina kiη iwićayaću kta he? (When are you going to get the boys)?
Tohan nihuηkake iwićayaću kta he? (When are you going to get your parents)?
Tohaη śuηkawakaη kiη iwićayaću kta he? (When are you getting the horses)?



Tokiya da he? (Where are you going)?
Tokiya ada he? (Where are you taking it)?
Tokiya Chaske ada he? (Where are you taking Chaske)?
Tokiya Uηći ada he? (Where are you taking Grandmother)?
Tokiya Ina ada he? (Where are you taking Mom)?
Tokiya hokśina kiη awićada he? (Where are you taking the boys)?
Tokiya awićada he? (Where are you taking them)?
Tokiya wakaηheźa kiη awićada he? (Where are you taking the children)?


Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4 Lesson 5 Lesson 6
Lesson 7 Lesson 8 Lesson 9 Lesson 10 Lesson 11 Lesson 12

 

Dakoteyah Wogdaka!
Talk Dakota!

Lesson 10

Aηpetu Iyohi Wićoie
(everyday words)

Wowapi/wowapiska (paper) Psića (jump)
Ćaηwiyowa/wićaǵo/wićazo (pencil, pen) Iyadi (climb)
Yawa (read, count) Iyakaśka (to tie)
Eya (to say) Yuśka (untie)
Owa (write) Katoto (knock)
Ićaǵo (draw, sketch, trace) Kićuη (put on)
Iteowapi (portrait, picture, to take a picture) Yuśdoka (take off)
Śaya (color) Teća (new)
Wiuηpi/iuηpi (paint, to paint) Taηni (old, used)
Iyuśda (scissors) Ih́peya (discard, throw away)
Yuksa/kaśda/yuśda (cut) Kud (down)
Ia/woh́daka (speak, talk) Kudkiya (downward)
Oyaka (tell) Piya (to fix)
Ih́a/ih́ata (smile, laugh) Piyepićaśni (unfixable)
Dowaη (sing) Titokaη/titokaηipi (visit, to visit)
Odowaη (song) Tokeća (different)
Waći (dance) Iyećeća (same)
Śkata (play) Iću (get it)
Naźiη (stand) Ikikću (get yours)
Inaźiη (stand up, stop) Tawa (his, hers, its)
Yaηka (sit) Tawapi (theirs)
Iyotaηka (sit down) Mitawa (mine)
Iwaηka (lie down, go to bed) Nitawa (yours)
Kikta (wake up) Uηkitawapi (ours)
Iśtiηma (sleep)
Iηyaηka (run)

Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4 Lesson 5 Lesson 6
Lesson 7 Lesson 8 Lesson 9 Lesson 10 Lesson 11 Lesson 12

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