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Dakota Talk Radio to Tackle the Issues on FM Airwaves

by Vincent Schilling, February 17, 2011

Dakota Talk Radio KDKO 89.5 FM, has only been a radio station on the internet for the past four years, but in a matter of weeks, the Native radio station will be hitting the FM airwaves serving the communities surrounding Lake Andes, South Dakota. From the onset, KDKO will be tackling tough issues such as date rape, drug and alcohol prevention and violence against women addressed by native youth in the form of Public Service Announcements.

Read more: Dakota Talk Radio to Tackle the Issues on FM Airwaves

Charon Asetoyer Among Group to Travel to Washington, DC Requesting Stronger Sexual Assault Policies

Monday, July 13, 2009

(Washington, DC) – On Monday, July 13, a group of noted Native American and Alaska Native women advocates met with federal lawmakers in Washington, DC, to advocate for stronger policies to combat sexual violence against Native women and ensure victims’ access to care and justice.

Read more: Charon Asetoyer Among Group to Travel to Washington, DC Requesting Stronger Sexual Assault Policies

Charon Asetoyer Testifies in Congress

April 2009

(Washington, DC) – The U.S. House Interior and Environment Appropriations subcommittee heard testimony on Wednesday, March 25, from a leading Native American expert on sexual violence against Native American and Alaska Native women. The testimony came following the passage of the Fiscal Year 2009 Omnibus Appropriations Act, which made significant progress addressing sexual violence in Indian Country, and in preparation for the drafting of the Fiscal Year 2010 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill.

Read more: Charon Asetoyer Testifies in Congress

Charon Asetoyer Profiled in Glamour Magazine

August 2008

The article, titled "The Land Where Rapists Walk Free", explores the reasons why Native women are at such risk of sexual violence and why survivors are so frequently denied justice. See the full article at: www.glamour.com/inspired/magazine/2008/07/global-diary

Read more: Charon Asetoyer Profiled in Glamour Magazine

NAWHERC Featured on South Dakota Public Broadcasting

July 29, 2008

South Dakota Public Broadcasting featured NAWHERC and Executive Director Charon Asetoyer in their July 29, 2008 broadcast of Dakota Digest.

Read more: NAWHERC Featured on South Dakota Public Broadcasting

Charon Asetoyer at VDay's 10th Anniversary Event

April 2008

NAWHERC Executive Director Charon Asetoyer was a featured speaker at VDay's 10th Anniversary Celebration 'Superlove', April 11-12, 2008, at the Superdome in New Orleans, LA.

Read more: Charon Asetoyer at VDay's 10th Anniversary Event

Teen Dating Violence Prevention Curriculum

by Amelia Chew, Spring 2002


Roughly one in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. Furthermore, one in five adolescent girls experiences physical or sexual violence perpetrated by her dating partner, according to a recent large-scale study. The prevalence of dating violence is staggering, its impact enormous.

Read more: Teen Dating Violence Prevention Curriculum

Dakota Language and Culture Immersion

by Karen Grundy & Rachel Reichlin
"Hinhanna Waste" With Good Morning!" the day begins. The Dakota Language Immersion Programs meets 3 days a week for 6 weeks during the summer months of July and August. Between 20-24 children are registered each summer and the classes are held at the Native American Women's Health Resource Center.

Read more: Dakota Language and Culture Immersion

Food System Preservation Program

Spring 2002

Each year, gatherers of indigenous plants traditionally used by the Yankton Sioux report that the food sources have become harder and harder to find. Chokecherry trees, wild plum bushes, medicine herbs, wild berries, vegetables, and roots are encroached upon by the development, farming, and ranching that overrode wild prairie. Now toxic herbicides and pesticides are used to kill off many medicinal plants that farmers consider “weeds.” Yet for generations, indigenous plants provided us with nutritional foods and medicines adapted to our body systems and played important parts in our ceremonies.

Read more: Food System Preservation Program

Speaking on Indigenous Issues at UN

by Renee Bartocquteh, Fall 2001

The United Nations estimates that there are at least 5,000 Indigenous Nations composed of 300 million people living in more than 70 countries on five continents; however, the cultures of Indigenous Peoples are precariously balanced on the edge of extinction. In light of these numerous threats, each year at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, hundreds of Indigenous Peoples gathered on August 9 to observe the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples.

Read more: Speaking on Indigenous Issues at UN

SisterSong Native Women's Reproductive Rights and Health Roundtable Convenes

By Amelia Chew, May 2000


In 1990, 37 women representing over 11 tribes convened in Pierre, South Dakota, and created the historic "Native American Women's Reproductive Rights Agenda." From its inception, the document has guided Native American women advocates by blazing a space for indigenous women's reproductive health concerns beyond the foci of mainstream feminist movements on abortion and contraception.

Read more: SisterSong Native Women's Reproductive Rights and Health Roundtable Convenes

Mascot Controversy

Charon Asetoyer, February 1999

Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center Co-Opted into Mascot Controversy with donation pledge from Chief Illiniwek support group.

Read more: Mascot Controversy

Tribute to a Warrior Woman

March 1999

Honoring Ingrid Washinawatok, 1957-1999, co-chair of the Indigenous Women's Network and Executive Director of the Fund for Four Directions.

Read more: Tribute to a Warrior Woman

IHS Response Focus Group

Focus Group Details IHS Response to Reproductive Health Issues
by Gillian Ehrlich, March 1999

On February 3, 1999, the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center conducted a focus group of Native women who use Indian Health Services within the Aberdeen area of South Dakota as their primary care provider. Women from the various tribes within the Aberdeen area, ranging in age from 18 to 37 years, participated in the group. The purpose of this focus group was to gain perspectives concerning IHS’s response and treatment of Reproductive Health issues. This information will influence NAWHERC’s RTI (reproductive tract infection) education campaign.

Read more: IHS Response Focus Group

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